St Cross Church, Knutsford
St Cross Church, Knutsford, is in the town of Knutsford, Cheshire, England. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II* listed building, in the deanery of Knutsford, the archdeaconry of Macclesfield, and the diocese of Chester. It is an active Anglican parish church, with three services every Sunday, a midweek Eucharist each Wednesday, and Morning Prayer most weekdays. The Parish Electoral Roll is 158, and about a hundred people attend Sunday morning services.

History
The original St Cross church was dedicated in February 1858, and the present church was built between 1880 and 1881 by Paley and Austin. The tower was added in 1887.

Architecture

Exterior
It is built in brick with terracotta dressings in Perpendicular style. The roof is in red tiles and lead. Its plan consists of a nave with north and south aisles, a tower at the crossing, and a chancel with north and south chapels. A two-storey vestry is on the south, and a porch is to the west of the north aisle. The tower is in three stages with a four-light Decorated style window above which is a terracotta frieze. In the second stage are small square windows. The upper stage contains two-light bell openings and a blind traceried frieze. The parapet is of stone with pinnacles at the angles and in the centre of each side.

Interior
Inside the church the north arcade has three bays, and the south arcade has two bays with the vestry occupying the western bay. The chancel screen and pulpit are both made from traceried timber. The organ occupies the chapel to the south of the chancel. On the south chancel wall is a sedilia with heavy terracotta Perpendicular tracery. In a wooden case on a pier of the south nave arcade is a low relief bronze sculpture dated 1607 depicting the Deposition from the Cross . Two of the stained glass windows were designed by Burne-Jones and made by Morris & Co. The west window is dated 1893 and depicts the Adoration of the Magi . The easternmost window in the south aisle is dated 1899 and shows the Good Samaritan .

Building Activity

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