Pool Pavillion

This recreatinional structure is conceived of as a rift in the landscape, along the shore of Lake George. Less a building than an earth form, the structure serves as a central gathering place, which unites the existing family and guest houses around a series of exterior and interior spaces. The program includes outdoor playfields, terraces, patios, gym, and office.
Much of the program, including the pool, gym, and theatre are topped with sod roofs to create an upper terrance and large playing fields. These fields are linked to the lake, pool, gym and courtyard below by sod rapms and bluestone stairs. Continuous planes of low iron glass and large sliding panels connect the pool space to the outside, allowing the pool to act as a kind of indoor-outdoor bridge between the formes sunken courtyard on one sde, and the natural world of the lake ont he other. Continuous walls of locally-quarried bluestone wrap around and through the structure demarcating the landscape rift as the central organizing element.
A two-story copper-clad structure, the sole vertical element of the building's form, rises out of the flat landscape. On the secound floor, a small office serves as a lookout point for the site. Its cooper shingles reflect the forest behind on the one side, and expanses of glass give way to 180 degree views of the lake on the other. The ceiling in the pool room is inverted planes of fabric. On the underside of the land bridge, the fabric ridge serves as a subtle counterpoint of the landscape forms.
The fabric ceilings also provides complete accoustics transparency by adding acoustcal insulation to what would typically be a reverberant pool space. The building uses the synergies of deep geothermal wells and a heat recovery dehumidification system to efficientlyheat the pool, while cooling the rest of the building.
The expreience of the pool and its adjoiing spaces suggest alternative ways of both viewing and prticipating in the Adirondack Landscape.This recreatinional structure is conceived of as a rift in the landscape, along the shore of Lake George. Less a building than an earth form, the structure serves as a central gathering place, which unites the existing family and guest houses around a series of exterior and interior spaces. The program includes outdoor playfields, terraces, patios, gym, and office.
Much of the program, including the pool, gym, and theatre are topped with sod roofs to create an upper terrance and large playing fields. These fields are linked to the lake, pool, gym and courtyard below by sod rapms and bluestone stairs. Continuous planes of low iron glass and large sliding panels connect the pool space to the outside, allowing the pool to act as a kind of indoor-outdoor bridge between the formes sunken courtyard on one sde, and the natural world of the lake ont he other. Continuous walls of locally-quarried bluestone wrap around and through the structure demarcating the landscape rift as the central organizing element.
A two-story copper-clad structure, the sole vertical element of the building's form, rises out of the flat landscape. On the secound floor, a small office serves as a lookout point for the site. Its cooper shingles reflect the forest behind on the one side, and expanses of glass give way to 180 degree views of the lake on the other. The ceiling in the pool room is inverted planes of fabric. On the underside of the land bridge, the fabric ridge serves as a subtle counterpoint of the landscape forms.
The fabric ceilings also provides complete accoustics transparency by adding acoustcal insulation to what would typically be a reverberant pool space. The building uses the synergies of deep geothermal wells and a heat recovery dehumidification system to efficientlyheat the pool, while cooling the rest of the building.
The expreience of the pool and its adjoiing spaces suggest alternative ways of both viewing and prticipating in the Adirondack Landscape.
Description from the architects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Media

6 photos and 1 drawing

Building Activity