One New Change
ONE NEW CHANGE One New Change is a mixed use development designed by Jean Nouvel in collaboration with Sidell Gibson Architects for Land Securities. It is located in the City of London, opposite St Paul's Cathedral and comprising of three retail floors and four levels of offices with a public restaurant and roof terrace on the sixth floor. The building is organized around intersecting pedestrian passages, which will create retail arcades at lower-ground, ground and first floor levels and will be open to the public during retail opening hours. The central �crossing� will become a gathering point and a focus of the public realm. The retail arcade adjacent to New Change will be open to the sky and oriented towards St. Paul�s Cathedral to open up views of the Cathedral from the site. The routes through the site will be attractive by reason of their status as pedestrian routes and by the drama and excitement of the building itself and the views obtained from it. The protection from the weather in the arcades will be an attractive feature both for those wishing to pass through the development and for those wanting to pause and make use of the facilities within it. One New Change will have a transformational effect on City shopping and leisure. The City lacks a major retail destination in order to rival West End. It is part of the Cheapside Retail Initiative, to revitalize the whole area, with One New Change at its hart. Cheapside was historically London's high street but its shopping offer has been in decline for decade. The area is bustling during the week, but at weekends is almost deserted. The development will create the critical mass needed to create a lively focal point for the City to make it alive and active during seven days a week. The development also responds to changing social, technological and economic conditions by providing both office space and retail spaces that can meet the accommodation requirements of a wide variety of tenants and are flexible enough to adapt to changing markets and circumstances; for example office floor-plates can be sub-divided in many different ways to provide widely varying amounts of accommodation and the retail floors are capable of being divided into units of widely varying sizes, on more than one floor if that is what the market requires. THE FA�ADE The development has a strong sense of identity and character. Whilst the form and materials of the building are highly original, they also respond to the local surroundings, for example in the use of colour to respond to the colour of surrounding buildings. The fa�ade consist of a very complex glazing treatment that subtly changes from opaque and matt to transparent, which has been created using a highly intricate coloured frit patterns. In the specialist area of fritted pattern glass, One New Change is regarded as a pioneer. It is the first building to screen print a white etch frit pattern onto the exterior face of glass. The frit used on the envelope was the most complex aspect of the cladding, involving the dot patterns that transform from ovals into parallelograms, while the percentage of frit coverage gradually changes from 90% to 10%. ENERGY In regard to sustainable design, the Ground Source Energy system utilizing heat pumps is being installed at the One New Change site, as part of the Greater London Authorities requirements for achieving 10% renewable energy. This would provide saving in the region of 900 tonnes of CO2 annually from combination of closed loop and open loop system. The system installed at One New Change Project will be one of the largest ground sourced heating solution in the UK, when completed.

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  • added a digital reference
    about 5 years ago via OpenBuildings.com
  • myopinion
    myopinion commented
    I went to OneNewChange place this weekend (14th Nov 2010), walked through, looked around and left. I found it cold and sterile. On the weekend I would have liked a place to go and sit and have a coffee and read the paper. Then do some shopping. The shops all looked the same with the same types of clothing in each. The food area could have been better designed with an open seating area where you could buy take out food and coffee and sit and relax (Singapore style) and to look out through the many glass windows. The only places really to eat a quick snack were EAT and Wasabi. However these places are not comfortable places to sit in. Also the great expanse of windows surrounding the place could have been put to better use, the place felt dark and claustrophobic. This could have been a really innovative space in the city, a place where tourists could visit (as it's right next to St Paul's). For locals it could have been a central shopping place and a place to recharge. Sadly it's neither of these. When I was there, there weren't that many people (as it was raining), but shopping malls are places people go to when it's cold and raining outside. On a good note, it does look nice from the outside.
    about 6 years ago via OpenBuildings.com
  • myopinion
    myopinion commented
    about 6 years ago via OpenBuildings.com
  • myopinion
    myopinion commented
    about 6 years ago via OpenBuildings.com