Kinnaird Head
Kinnaird Head ( Scottish Gaelic: An Ceann Àrd, "high headland") is a headland projecting into the North Sea, within the town of Fraserburgh, Aberdeenshire on the east coast of Scotland. It is the site of the first lighthouse in Scotland to be lit by the Commissioners of Northern Lights. The light was designed by Thomas Smith, built in 1787, and now forms part of the Museum of Scottish Lighthouses.

Kinnaird Castle
The Kinnaird Castle (one of The Nine Castles of Knuckle ), was built in 1570 by Sir Alexander Fraser, 8th laird of Philorth and sold to the Trustees of the Northern lights in 1787, who turned it into a lighthouse. The last to reside in the castle were John Gordon of Kinellar (1684-1764) and his wife, Henrietta Fraser (1698-1751).

Lighthouse
The original light at Kinnaird Head was established by Thomas Smith on 1 December 1787. A lantern was set 120 feet above the sea on a tower of the old castle. Whale oil lamps produced a fixed light, each backed by a parabolic reflector. Kinnaird Head was the most powerful light of its time, and contained 17 reflectors arranged in 3 horizontal tiers. It was reported to be visible 12 or 14 miles off. In 1824, internal alternations were made to incorporate a new lantern and to provide accommodation for the lightkeepers. In 1906 the light was converted to incandescent operation. In 1929 Kinnaird Head became home to the first Radio Beacon in Scotland. The Fog Signal was discontinued in 1987. The original lighthouse is no longer operational and is now home to The Museum of Scottish Lighthouses. A new automatic light was established beside the original light in 1991.

Winetower
The Winetower is a small three story tower located approximately 50 metres from Kinnaird Head Lighthouse. It is reputed that in the cave below, one of the Fraser family imprisoned his daughter's boyfriend, leaving him to drown there. The daughter then jumped from the roof of the tower. There is red paint on the rocks below to illustrate her blood. According to local tradition, the tower is said to be haunted.

Museum of Scottish Lighthouses
The Museum of Scottish Lighthouses at Kinnaird Head incorporates the original lighthouse and a modern building housing collections of lenses and other artefacts from many lighthouses across Scotland. The museum hosts a wide range of special events throughout the year, and includes a cafe and gift shop.

Footnotes

Building Activity

  • Georgi Sokolov
    Georgi Sokolov activity.buildings_person.create
    about 6 years ago via OpenBuildings.com