Johnson Hall State Historic Site

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Johnson Hall State Historic Site
Johnson Hall State Historic Site was the home of Sir William Johnson (1715”“1774) an Irish pioneer and British Indian agent in the Province of New York. The house was built seven miles from the Mohawk River, close to Hall Creek. Hall Creek provided water sufficient to power a sawmill and later a grist mill. The house was built of wood and covered with clapboards to simulate stone. Because there were no professional architects available, Johnson drew up the plans for the house himself, and hired a carpenter, Samuel Fuller, to build it. At least some of the ideas for the house came from the Builders' Companion magazine. Two block houses were built to defend against attack. Johnson founded Johnstown, New York, and came to own a 400,000 acre (160 km²) estate. Johnson moved here from Old Fort Johnson in 1763 and lived here until he died in 1774. Johnson Hall was seized by the rebel government during the American Revolution because the Johnsons were Loyalists. It was subsequently purchased as a private residence by Silas Talbot. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1960. Johnson Hall is located at Hall Avenue, West State Street and Johnson Avenue, in Johnstown, New York