Herman Coors House
Herman Coors House, also known as Roy and Rosalie Cole House was the home of Herman Frederick Coors. It was originally built as a modest bungalow in 1915 by Elmer Johnson, a builder who later in 1934 built the brewhouse of the Coors Brewery. In 1917 the house was purchased by Coors, a younger son of Adolph Coors, who hired noted area architect Jacques Benedict to transform it into a beautiful and artistic Tudor Revival style home, with a wooden arch front door canopy and stone terracing around. Coors was an officer of the Coors Porcelain Company, and in 1921 moved away to Inglewood, California where he established the H.F. Coors Company to manufacture porcelain there. The house was then purchased by banker Edward A. Phinney, who owned the Rubey National Bank in downtown Golden. He built a companion cottage and barn behind the house in 1928. His fortunes took a tragic turn, however, during the Bank Holiday of the Great Depression, when he lost much of his fortune trying to save the bank. Since that time the home has remained very well and artistically preserved. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1997.