House with Chimaeras, or Gorodetsky House is an Art Nouveau building in Kiev, the capital of Ukraine. Originally an upmarket apartment building, it was built in the period of 1901–1902 by noted architect Vladislav Gorodetsky, who was regarded as the Gaudí of Kiev.
 
      Situated on No. 10, Bankova Street, across from the President of Ukraine's office in the historic Pechersk neighbourhood, the building has been used since 2005 as a presidential residence for official and diplomatic ceremonies.The "House with Chimaeras" derives its popular name from its ornate decorations depicting various scenes of exotic animals and hunting scenes, which were added because Gorodetsky was an avid hunter. The name does not refer to the chimaera of mythology, but to an architectural style known as Chimaera decoration in which animal figures are applied as decorative elements to a building.
 
      The House with Chimaeras was designed by the architect Vladislav Gorodetsky in 1901–1902. Gorodetsky was born in 1863 into a prosperous Polish szlachta family in the Podillia region.After finishing the Imperial Academy of Arts in Saint Petersburg in 1890, he moved to Kiev, where he lived for almost 30 years.At the time of the building's construction, Gorodetsky had already established himself as a prominent Kiev architect, having designed many city buildings, from the St. Nicholas Roman Catholic Cathedral to the Karaim Kenesa and the current National Art Museum of Ukraine. Besides architecture, Gorodetsky was also interested in big-game hunting, which explains why his building features many animals.
 
      Gorodetsky financed the house's construction with borrowed money,with the intent for it to be an apartment building. Each floor formed a single apartment, connected by an elevator and stairs.Gorodetsky himself occupied the fourth floor of the building, measuring at about 380 m2 (4,100 sq ft). Gorodetsky bought the first lot of land on February 1, 1901, with construction work commencing on March 18 of that year. Construction of the exterior walls was finished by August 21, and the roof installed and all masonry work was completed on September 13.Due to the economic hardships within the Russian Empire, the completion of the building was delayed. In May 1903, only one apartment on the lowest level and Gorodetsky's own apartment were occupied. The total cost of the land and construction amounted to 133,000 rubles.  In total, 1,550 m2 (16,700 sq ft) of land were used for construction of the building and cost a total of 15,640 rubles.The projected annual profit from the rentals was 7,200 rubles. A cowshed was located on the premises due to Gorodetsky's insistence on fresh in-house milk,though it was specifically placed in a way that the smell of the cows would not disturb the tenants. On a lot adjacent to the building, a miniature alpine garden (approx. 320 m2/3,400 sq ft) and a fountain were built.
 
      The building was designed in the Art Nouveau style, which was at that time a relatively new style and featured flowing, curvilinear designs often incorporating floral and other plant-inspired motifs. Gorodetsky featured such motifs in the building's exterior decor in the forms of mythical creatures and big-game animals. His work on the House with Chimaeras has earned him the nickname of the Gaudí of Kiev.
 
      Due to the steep slope on which the building is situated, it had to be specially designed out of concrete to fit into its foundations correctly. From the front, the building appears to have only three floors. However, from the rear, all of its six floors can be seen.[18] One part of the building's foundation was made of concrete piles, and the other as a continuous foundation. Usually, these two approaches do not mix well but Gorodetsky somehow succeeded in overcoming this technical problem.
 
       The Italian sculptor Emilio Sala was responsible for both the internal and external sculptural decorations, such as mermaids, dolphins, and frogs on the roof of the building, sinking ships and hunting trophies on the exterior walls, and exuberant interior decorations, such as grand stairways and chandeliers depicting huge catfish strangled in the stems of lotus flowers. The exterior sculptures created by Sala were made out of cement. Production of the cement was by the «For» company of which Gorodetsky was the co-director.Cement was used exclusively as the primary building material by the request of the company's head director, Richter. At the time of the building's construction, cement was not popular as a building material, so its use was employed as publicity for both the house and the building material.
 
      The House with Chimaeras was designed in such a way that the tenants would occupy the whole floor, each floor had all the necessary household rooms ranging from private kitchens to small powder rooms. The open floor plan and extra rooms featured throughout the building are characteristic of the houses of the wealthy of the early twentieth century.In total, the building has an area of 3,309.5 m2 (35,623.16 sq ft).
 
      On the lowest level of the building, which is located deep in the hill, were two stables, two rooms for coachmen, a shared laundry, and two separate apartments. Each of the two apartments consisted of a foyer, a kitchen, one bathroom, and a storage room. The first of these apartments had two residential rooms, and the second three rooms. Each floor above the lowest level was designed to house a single apartment only.
 
      The apartment on the second floor consisted of six residential rooms in addition to a foyer, kitchen, buffet, three servant's rooms, a bathroom, two toilets, and two storage rooms. There were also four wine cellars on the same level.The cellars belonged to the apartments on the upper levels. On the third floor, the apartment consisted of eight residential rooms, a foyer, a kitchen, dish washing room, two rooms for servants, a bathroom, and two toilets.This apartment was placed slightly lower than the level of Bankova Street, from the front entrance.
 
      The grandest apartment, which belonged to Gorodetsky, consisted of a study, a great room and a living room, a dining room, a boudoir, a bedroom, a children's room, a room for a governess, a guest room, three rooms for servants, a kitchen, dishwashing room, bathroom, two toilets, and two storage rooms.On the floor above was an apartment similar in size and design to Gorodetsky's apartment.The apartment on the top floor had one less room; to make up for this, there was a connecting terrace which provided a panoramic view of the city.

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  • Denis Drachev
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    Адрес: ул.Банковая, 10 )
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  • Sergey Prishak
    Sergey Prishak commented
    А где это? На Ленина?
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  • Michael Holub
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    Та да
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    Правду кажешь хлопец
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    Michael Holub commented
    Прыкольный дом ;)
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