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Freedom Tower



U.S.
National Register of
Historic Places



U.S. National Historic
Landmark









The Freedom Tower in downtown Miami as of April 2007.
















Location:


Miami,
Florida,
USA



Coordinates:






25°46′48″N
80°11′23″W

 / 

25.78°N 80.18972°W
 /
25.78; -80.18972





Coordinates:




25°46′48″N
80°11′23″W

 / 

25.78°N 80.18972°W
 /
25.78; -80.18972








Built/Founded:

1925


[2
]




Architect:

George A. Fuller, Schultze & Weaver


[2
]



[1
]




Architectural style(s):


Spanish Renaissance Revival


[2
]





Governing body:

Private



Added to
NRHP:


September 10, 1979



Designated
NHL:


October 6, 2008



NRHP Reference#:

79000665


[1
]



The
Freedom Tower is a historic 1925 landmark building in
Miami,
Florida, that serves as
a memorial to
Cuban immigration to the
United
States. It is located at 600
Biscayne Boulevard on the
Wolfson Campus of
Miami
Dade College. On September 10, 1979, it was added to the
U.S.
National Register of
Historic Places. It was designated a U.S.
National Historic Landmark
on October 6, 2008.


[3
]





Contents
 



  • 1
    History


  • 2
    Trivia


  • 3
    Gallery


  • 4
    References


  • 5
    External links





[
edit]
History
Originally completed in 1925 as the headquarters and printing
facility of the Miami
News & Metropolis newspaper, it is an example of
Mediterranean Revival style with design elements borrowed from the
Giralda Tower in
Seville,
Spain. Its cupola on a 255
foot (78 m) tower contained a decorative beacon.
In 1957 The Miami News vacated the building to move to a new
state-of-the-art facility on the
Miami River. As
refugees from Cuba fleeing the
Castro
communist regime arrived in Miami in the 1960s, the
federal
government used the facility to process, document and provide
medical and dental services for the
newcomers. After the major wave of refugees
ended in 1972, the government sold the building in 1974. The
building passed through several owners before and after being
listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.


[4
]

In 1997 the building was purchased for US$4.1 million by
Jorge Mas
Canosa, founder and leader of the
Cuban American National
Foundation, and restored and converted into a monument for the
refugees who fled to the United States from communist Cuba. It
housed a
museum,
library,
meeting hall, and the offices of the
Cuban American National
Foundation.
In 2004, the Freedom Tower was purchased by developer Pedro
Martin and his company, Terra Group, who proposed a new building
(possibly condominiums) on an adjacent part of the property.
Preservationists opposed the plan, and in 2005 the developers
donated Freedom Rower to
Miami
Dade College, which is using it as a cultural and educational
center. The city later granted approval to the developers to build
on the back of the property without demolishing the original
tower.
More recently, Miami Dade College has hosted major exhibitions
including showcasing the works of masters
Dali,
Goya and
Da
Vinci since the Martin family donated the tower to the
institution. It has plans to expand the offerings at the Tower and
install exhibitions honoring the Freedom Tower’s past as the home
of a major newspaper and the site where hundreds of thousands of
Cuban refugees were processed. The college will also honor the
building’s architecture. It recently restored the New World Mural
on the mezzanine level of the Tower. Miami Dade College is a
national model for its cultural programming.

[
edit]
Trivia

  • The Freedom Tower was used as a sniper's post in "Hit List", a
    season one episode from
    Miami Vice, where
    a hit man attempted to kill Crockett.


[
edit]
Gallery












Miami Freedom Tower's cupola












Westside - Backside





[
edit]

 

Media

5 photos

Building Activity

  • updated a digital reference
    about 5 years ago via Annotator
  • ffff
    ffff updated a digital reference
    about 5 years ago via OpenBuildings.com
  • Georgi Sokolov
    Georgi Sokolov updated
    about 5 years ago via OpenBuildings.com