Frederiksberg Courthouse

Classical and Dynamic

The expansion to the Frederiksberg Courthouse takes its signal from the distinct roof and robust materials of the neighboring neo-classical facility designed by Hack Kampmann. The design of the courthouse is therefore composed with clear references to the architectural style of the refined neighborhood of Frederiksberg – but still distinctly making its mark within the context of the place.

An Expression of Solidity

The proposal takes its shape from the site boundaries, and is designed at a respectful angle of 45 degrees to the listed existing court building. The result is an open corridor between the two buildings while maintaining a visual distinction for the Kampmann building. These challenges are the basis for a structure which is both classical and dynamic with its curved form – standing as a modern interpretation of the classical saddle style roof.

The facade expresses the structure’s solidity – constructed in tile to create a relationship between the existing building scape. The light tone provides the building with its own sense of identity.

Optimal Flow

While the exterior form places emphasis on adjacencies with the existing building, the interior focuses on compliance with the law reform’s requirements on security and internal segregations in the building. Therefore, the building provides its employees, the defendants, witnesses and guests an open environment with an optimally separated flow between the different user groups. A small atrium cuts through the middle of the building; drawing light into the interior and creating an open and airy connection across departments.

Description by architects

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Building Activity

  • Nadezhda Nikolova
    Nadezhda Nikolova updated, added a digital reference, updated 9 media and uploaded 9 media
    Retten Frederiksberg Retten Frederiksberg Retten Frederiksberg Retten Frederiksberg Retten Frederiksberg Retten Frederiksberg Retten Frederiksberg Retten Frederiksberg Retten Frederiksberg
    about 5 years ago via OpenBuildings.com