El Rey Theatre

El Rey Theatre is currently a live music venue in the Miracle Mile area of the Mid-Wilshire region in Los Angeles, California. "El Rey" means "The King" in Spanish. This art deco building was designed by Clifford A. Balch (who designed over twenty classic art deco movie theatres around Southern California). Much of the theatre, including the lobby, still retains its art deco roots, admired for its Zigzag and Streamline Moderne design.

El Rey was originally built in 1936 as a single-screen movie theatre and functioned as a cinema for nearly 50 years. From the 1980s to the early 1990s El Rey Theatre was a dance-music club called Wall Street, but since 1994 this theatre has been a live music venue which is now exclusively booked through Goldenvoice. The capacity is approximately 700 and it also has a VIP balcony in the back.

The theatre was designated as Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument No. 520 on February 26, 1991.

In popular culture
  • The El Rey can be seen in the 1988 Touchstone Pictures film Who Framed Roger Rabbit (as well as in unused promotional artwork), though the El Rey seen in the film is not the real theater. Instead, it was actually a facade on Hope Street in Los Angeles, where several scenes of the film were shot.
  • The El Rey can be seen in the film "License To Drive" as a night club.
  • The El Rey is featured prominently in the 1984 sci-fi film Night of the Comet.

Media

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Building Activity

  • OpenBuildings
    OpenBuildings updated a digital reference
    about 6 years ago via Annotator
  • OpenBuildings
    OpenBuildings updated a digital reference and added a digital reference
    about 6 years ago via OpenBuildings.com