Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul Railway Iron River Depot

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Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul Railway Iron River Depot
The Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul Railway Iron River Depot, located in Iron River, Michigan was built by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (otherwise known as the Milwaukee Road) in 1913. The brick depot has a modified Neoclassical design and is rectangular in shape. The depot has a covered porch on one end that connected to the waiting room. The station agent's office was located in the middle of the building, and a freight room was on the other end. The railroad came to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to serve the local iron mines and timber industry. It built the branch line that terminated in Iron River in 1913. Passenger service connected to the main line at Channing, Michigan. Passenger service to Iron River ended in 1945. The railroad provided bus service between Sagola, Michigan and Iron River until 1956. The railroad ceased bus service in 1956. The depot was sold to a local produce company for use as a warehouse. The depot was subsequently sold to an equipment company. In 1993, the depot was sold again. The new owners rehabilitated the depot and turned in into a restaurant and bakery. The new owners also bought two old ex-Long Island Railroad passenger coaches and added them to the depot as part of a railroad themed restaurant. The depot was listed on the National Register of Historic Places because of its architecture and also because of its association with the development of Iron River. It is also significant as the last remaining railway station in Iron River.