Chicago Great Western Railroad Depot

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Chicago Great Western Railroad Depot
The Chicago Great Western Railroad Depot is a historic railway station in the village of Elizabeth, Illinois, USA. It was built in 1877”“78 and like many rural stations along the Chicago Great Western Railroad it was cast in Stick style. The building was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1996.

History
The Elizabeth, Illinois Chicago Great Western Railroad Depot was built in 1877”“78 by the Minnesota Northwestern Railway Company. In January 1892, A.B. Stickney's Chicago Great Western Railroad company bought the Minnesota Northwestern company.

Architecture
The design of the depot in Elizabeth is similar to the design of many of the rural stations built during the 1880s and 1890s along the Chicago Great Western Railroad. Many of these stations, including the Elizabeth depot, were small rectangular, side-gabled buildings built in Stick style. Through the years, some of the depot's original architectural details were lost.

Museum
Today the depot building is operated as a railroad museum. Located in a mixed commercial district, the area that was once the station's stockyard is now a lumber company, but the "Commercial Hotel", an 1889 hotel that served railroad patrons, across the street still stands. The depot was restored by the Elizabeth Historical Society and is meant to become an important repository of information about the Chicago Great Western Railroad.

Historic significance
The arrival of the depot in Elizabeth coincided with a record growth spurt between 1880”“1900. The population of Elizabeth rose from 507 to 659 during those two decades and by the 1910s unofficial numbers estimated the population at close to 1,000. The station and the railroad industry in Elizabeth heralded a new era in the village. On February 16, 1996 the Chicago Great Western Railroad Station in Elizabeth, Illinois was added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.