BedZED

 

The Beddington Zero Energy Development, or BedZED, is the UK’s largest eco-village. The multi-award winning development is one of the most coherent examples of sustainable living in the UK.

Initiated by BioRegional, BedZED was developed by the Peabody Trust development in partnership with BioRegional Development Group and designed by Bill Dunster Architects.

Located in Wallington, South London, BedZED comprises 82 homes, community facilities and workspace for 100 people. Residents have been living at BedZED since March 2002. The heating requirements of BedZED homes are around 10% that of a typical home.

Key ideas are:

 

 

 

- Zero-energy - The project only uses energy from renewable source generated on site. In addition to solar panels, tree waste fuels the development’s heat and electricity.
- High quality - The apartments are finished to a high standard to attract the urban professional.
- Energy efficient - the houses face south to take advantage of solar gain, are triple glazed and have high thermal insulation.
- Water efficient - most rain water falling on the site is collected and reused. Appliances are chosen to be water efficient and use recycled water where possible.
- Low impact materials - building materials selected from renewable or recycled sources and located within a 35 mile radius of the site to minimised the energy required for transportation.
- Waste recycling - refuse collection facilities are designed to support recycling.
- Transport - car parking spaces are limited, but residents share in a car pool.

The BedZED urban system reconciles high-density three-storey city blocks with high residential and workspace amenity. Workspace is placed in the shade zones of south facing housing terraces, with skygardens created on the workspace roofs, enabling all flats to have outdoor garden areas, with good access to sunlight, at the same time as providing well day lit workspace without problematic summer overheating. The combination of super-insulation, a wind driven ventilation system incorporating heat recovery, and passive solar gain stored within each flat by thermally massive floors and walls - reduces the need for both electricity and heat to the point where a 135 kW wood fuelled combined heat and power plant (chp) can meet the energy requirements for a community of around 240 residents and 200 workers. At these densities it would be possible to reduce urban sprawl in the UK to around 25 % of its current quota of nearly 11 % of the surface area of the UK, still incorporating playing fields, communal facilities, leisure facilities and workspace. The densification of our existing suburbs around public transportation nodes could in the long term reduce overcrowding on public transport, and live / work communities reduce reliance on private car use. The community treats all its black and grey water on site, and collects rainwater to minimise mains water consumption. To avoid over sizing the chp unit, a 109 kw peak photovoltaic installation provides enough solar electricity to power 40 electric cars, some pool, some taxi, some privately owned. The community has the capability to lead a carbon neutral lifestyle - with all energy for buildings and local transport being supplied by renewable energy sources.
The BedZED system is a third generation design developed over a five year period by Bill Dunster architects. The house prototype, initially based on Hope House at Hampton Court, was developed in the Hopetown theoretical urban model in conjunction with engineers Ove Arup and Partners, quantity surveyors Gardiner and Theobald, and the BioRegional Development Group. The current design provides a carefully researched balance between the competing needs of residents, small and large businesses, a healthy living centre, a nursery, a café / telecommuting centre, the need for sunlight and daylight, an economic construction system and high levels of insulation without losing contact with the outside world - whilst meeting the needs of the Peabody Trust to build a mixed tenure community on an existing brownfield site. 
The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
The BedZED urban system reconciles high-density three-storey city blocks with high residential and workspace amenity. Workspace is placed in the shade zones of south facing housing terraces, with skygardens created on the workspace roofs, enabling all flats to have outdoor garden areas, with good access to sunlight, at the same time as providing well day lit workspace without problematic summer overheating. The combination of super-insulation, a wind driven ventilation system incorporating heat recovery, and passive solar gain stored within each flat by thermally massive floors and walls - reduces the need for both electricity and heat to the point where a 135 kW wood fuelled combined heat and power plant (chp) can meet the energy requirements for a community of around 240 residents and 200 workers. At these densities it would be possible to reduce urban sprawl in the UK to around 25 % of its current quota of nearly 11 % of the surface area of the UK, still incorporating playing fields, communal facilities, leisure facilities and workspace. The densification of our existing suburbs around public transportation nodes could in the long term reduce overcrowding on public transport, and live / work communities reduce reliance on private car use. The community treats all its black and grey water on site, and collects rainwater to minimise mains water consumption. To avoid over sizing the chp unit, a 109 kw peak photovoltaic installation provides enough solar electricity to power 40 electric cars, some pool, some taxi, some privately owned. The community has the capability to lead a carbon neutral lifestyle - with all energy for buildings and local transport being supplied by renewable energy sources.
The BedZED system is a third generation design developed over a five year period by Bill Dunster architects. The house prototype, initially based on Hope House at 
The BedZED system is a third generation design developed over a five year period by Bill Dunster architects. The house prototype, initially based on Hope House at Hampton Court, was developed in the Hopetown theoretical urban model in conjunction with engineers Ove Arup and Partners, quantity surveyors Gardiner and Theobald, and the BioRegional Development Group. The current design provides a carefully researched balance between the competing needs of residents, small and large businesses, a healthy living centre, a nursery, a café / telecommuting centre, the need for sunlight and daylight, an economic construction system and high levels of insulation without losing contact with the outside world - whilst meeting the needs of the Peabody Trust to build a mixed tenure community on an existing brownfield site. 
The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
The BedZED system is a third generation design developed over a five year period by Bill Dunster architects. The house prototype, initially based on Hope House at Hampton Court, was developed in the Hopetown theoretical urban model in conjunction with engineers Ove Arup and Partners, quantity surveyors Gardiner and Theobald, and the BioRegional Development Group. The current design provides a carefully researched balance between the competing needs of residents, small and large businesses, a healthy living centre, a nursery, a café / telecommuting centre, the need for sunlight and daylight, an economic construction system and high levels of insulation without losing contact with the outside world - whilst meeting the needs of the Peabody Trust to build a mixed tenure community on an existing brownfield site. 
The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
The BedZED system is a third generation design developed over a five year period by Bill Dunster architects. The house prototype, initially based on Hope House at 
The BedZED system is a third generation design developed over a five year period by Bill Dunster architects. The house prototype, initially based on Hope House at Hampton Court, was developed in the Hopetown theoretical urban model in conjunction with engineers Ove Arup and Partners, quantity surveyors Gardiner and Theobald, and the BioRegional Development Group. The current design provides a carefully researched balance between the competing needs of residents, small and large businesses, a healthy living centre, a nursery, a café / telecommuting centre, the need for sunlight and daylight, an economic construction system and high levels of insulation without losing contact with the outside world - whilst meeting the needs of the Peabody Trust to build a mixed tenure community on an existing brownfield site. 

The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.

With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.

Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.

 


The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.

With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.

Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
The BedZED system is a third generation design developed over a five year period by Bill Dunster architects. The house prototype, initially based on Hope House at Hampton Court, was developed in the Hopetown theoretical urban model in conjunction with engineers Ove Arup and Partners, quantity surveyors Gardiner and Theobald, and the BioRegional Development Group. The current design provides a carefully researched balance between the competing needs of residents, small and large businesses, a healthy living centre, a nursery, a café / telecommuting centre, the need for sunlight and daylight, an economic construction system and high levels of insulation without losing contact with the outside world - whilst meeting the needs of the Peabody Trust to build a mixed tenure community on an existing brownfield site. 

The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.

With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.

Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
The partners in the BedZED team have now begun work on the fourth generation design based on the same brief - with the same densities, plot yields, and energy efficiency, but examining the capability to reduce build costs and build duration, by adding prefabrication. Using the BioRegional principles of local material and labour sourcing stimulating the local economy, maximise urban / rural links and minimise pollution from transportation - the team is now developing a site based prefabrication technique. On site workshops accept second hand materials directly from demolition sites, clean up both timber and steel, and use simple jigs to build structural frames. New hardwoods such as oak and chestnut are sourced from local WWF Forest Stewardship Council approved woodland. Local brick, concrete aggregate and precast floor planks can all be sourced within 35 miles of the site, ensuring that all bulky materials have a reduced embodied energy.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.
With the environmental performance parameters defined in advance, it is possible for developers to trade energy efficiency and emissions targets with the local planning authorities in return for permission to build more accommodation of all types. Providing it can be demonstrated that increased density can be achieved without net loss of amenity - ZEDfactory offers a useful way of funding the increased build costs of energy efficient schemes incorporating renewable energy features through planning gain. As BedZED has demonstrated, the true value of any site is determined by the amount of accommodation the local planning area subcommittee will allow to be built on it - empowering local communities to promote zero emissions developments, without relying on large central government grants, or asking the developer to pay for the increased build costs of super efficient urban fabric.
Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.


Adopting the 35 mile radius limit for local sourcing of bulk materials ensures each ZEDfactory site will use local materials, respect local market conditions and respect the existing townscape. Comprehensive environmental performance models matched to a market tested cost plan together with integrated transport strategy data promoting pedestrians, cyclists and public transport have already been completed for the ZEDfactory system, and can be tuned to each new site.

 

 

 On a brownfield wasteland site in the London Borough of Sutton the development provides 82 dwellings in a mixture of flats, maisonettes and town houses, and approximately 2,500 m² of workspace/office and community accommodation including a health centre, nursery, organic café/shop and sports club house.

 

 

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